The results are in….

“Let’s turn our fear into hope – and our hope into reality.”

Earlier this year we launched a campaign to understand what the hopes and fears are for bowel disease research.  We spoke with medical professionals, patients, members of the public and people who work in the business of bowel disease.

The results are in – and are summarised below.

Hopes

  • All patients and surgeons are involved in research
  • Relief from daily pain
  • Proper understanding of the side effects of IBD
  • Change British habits – diet, smoking and red meat
  • Anal cancer no longer a Cinderella area
  • Greater public awareness leading to no taboo or embarrassment
  • More personalised care and follow up
  • More expertise so enterocutaneous fistula can be repaired
  • Surgeons understand the language of the microbiome

Fears

  • Lack of funding
  • Lack of research education
  • No time for continuing professional development
  • There will never be a bag that doesn’t leak
  • Slow progress
  • Cancer increasing in young people
  • No improvements in screening options for bowel cancer

We’ll be taking a closer look at each of these areas in blog articles over the coming weeks and will be digging deeper into what this all means.

The aim of this exercise is to understand what’s on people’s minds in respects to research into bowel disease. By raising these topics, we hope to fuel conversations about how we can help to improve the lives of people who have a problem with their bowels – and also helping to prevent problems from occurring in the first place.

Essentially what we want to do is to turn our fear into hope and then our hope into reality.

Would you help us?

We would really like to know what you think about these topics so please do join in the conversation through any of our social media channels.

The first topic we’re going to discuss next week is TABOO.

Just what is it about our bowels that people don’t want to talk about? How can we get people to change their attitudes towards talking about bowel health?

Please do let us know what you think – don’t be shy.

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